Which is more effective on germs? Liquid Soap or Bar Soap? – Page 1 – Buck Ridge Soap
Welcome to Buck Ridge Soap Company located on Buck Ridge Mountain in Springfield, Arkansas!
USD

We primarily make bar soaps but our beard wash is liquid and can be used to wash hands as well as beards, hair and the whole body really. Both it and our bar soap are very effective at removing germs (as are all soaps really). 

Studies have consistently shown that germs that 'gather' on a bar of soap does not impact the efficiency of that soap to clean hands and remove bacteria and dirt. In fact, in the case of dirt and grime on hands, bar soap is better because of the friction used rubbing against the soap bar itself. 

Yes, liquid pump soaps are better in public places but at home, a good old bar of soap is just as effective AND is much better for the environment. 

Do I need to always use hot water to wash with? What about when camping?

Washing our hands in water alone will not efficiently remove all microorganisms but water is necessary to correctly wash our hands; It helps to lather the soap, disperse it around the skin and to rinse away the germs. Water temperature has not been shown to increase the removal of germs when hand washing so if all you have is bottled water or cold water you can still get your hands just as clean as with hot. 

What about "Antibacterial" soaps? 

All soap is antibacterial if you want to be technical. These are not actually soaps these are detergents with antibacterial chemicals added. These ingredients are primarily targeted at killing most bacteria. The detergent/soap element is actually the most effective part for removing viruses however, there is no evidence to suggest that the detergent effect is improved by the addition of antibacterial material! Manufacturers have pushed this idea into our minds but really, a regular bar of soap is just as effective at removing viruses as antibacterial detergent/soap. In fact, studies have shown that the overuse of antibacterial soaps can potentially add to the problem of antibiotic resistance in bacteria.

Leave a comment

Please note, comments must be approved before they are published